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Streets of Poltava

The Commune of Paris Street

The Commune of Paris Street

The Commune of Paris Street (formerly known as Dvoryanska, and after 1919 as Zalyvchogo Street) is located between Soborny Square and Monastyrska Street. It received its current name in 1923. This street is one of the oldest Poltava streets and can be found on maps of Poltava as early as 1783. The Spaska (Saviour) Church is located in the square between Commune of Paris and Zhovtneva Street. The Monument to Peter I’s Repose can be found at the junction of Spaska and Commune of Paris Street. In the past, the street was lined mostly with one-story houses. Many of the old buildings on Commune of Paris Street have survived to this day, including the Selastelnikova House, the Davidovych-Nashinsky House, where Lenin’s wife Nadezhda Krupskaya stayed in 1896, the Bakhmutsky House built in the Moorish style, the former military hospital, the former Moskovski bath house, and the Bazilevich Music School, where pupils studied playing piano and choral singing. Today many of the original houses have been replaced with modern multi-story apartment buildings.

Zhovtneva Street

Zhovtneva Street

Zhovtneva Street runs from Soborny (Cathedral) Square to General Zygin Square. This street is one of the oldest streets of the city, and one of its first paved streets (from Dormition Cathedral (Uspensky Sobor) to the Kyiv gate of the Poltava fortress). The street name has changed several times during the last two centuries. After the street was extended to the outskirts of Poltava, it was renamed Probivnaya Street. On some older maps it can also be found as Mostova Street. Other names for the street during the 19th and 20th centuries included Olexandrivska and Stalina. Since 1961 the street has been known as Zhovtneva Street; and today it is the main administrative, business and cultural center of Poltava.

Voskresenka Church was originally a wooden church, constructed in the late 1600s. In the 1770s the wooden church was replaced with a new brick church, donated by Cossack Colonel Rydenko. In the 19th century, a bell tower was added not far from the church. The church and the bell tower were completely destroyed in 1936. In 1971 a new building was constructed on the site of the church for the Poltava School of Music.

The Russian Foreign Trade ank building was constructed in the Modernist style in 1897 at the junction of Olexandrivska Street and Petrovska Square. The building was designed by architect Stasukov and civil engineer Nosov. Throughout existence the building has housed financial establishments. Since its renovation in 1990, the building served as the regional office of t National Bank of Ukraine.

The State Bank building was constructed in the French Renaissance style in 1897 based on a design by architect Shirshov. After 1917 it became the home of several local trade union organizations. In 1937, an additional wing was constructed along Zhovtneva Street. From 1937 until the mid-1940s, the building belonged to the Poltava Regional Committee of the Communist Party. Since the end of WWII, the building has been the home of the Teatralny Hotel.

Poltava’s beautiful Neoclassic Gogol Theater is located at Teatralna Square. The 800-seat theater was built in 1958 based on a design by architects Krylova and Malyshenko. Its repertoire consists mainly of plays and operas, featuring works of many Ukrainian playwrights and other artists, including Kislyakova, Kozhevnikova, Konopatsky, Lazarev, Miroshnichenko, Onipko, Prokopovich, Smiyan, Sumskoy, and Kashpersky. The theater itself, modeled after the Kharkiv Music Theater, was started in 1936. Prior to the construction of the new building, all performances took place in the «Kolos» movie theater. In the early 20th century, the intersection of Olexandrivska and Kotlyarevskogo Street was the site of the «Coliseum» movie theater, a center of cinematographic life in Poltava for many decades. Soon after the 1917 Revolution it was renamed the «Young Communist International Movie Theater». From 1920 until approximately 1930, the theater was famous for its so-called «dynamic advertisement», a type of advertisement which used different lighting systems and large size frames from movies. The movie theater was destroyed in 1943 during the liberation of Poltava. Today, an apartment building occupies the site.

Frunze, Monastyrska, Balakina and Skovorody Streets

Frunze Street

In the early 1800s Tsar Alexander I decided to increase Russian cloth production. To ensure the quick growth of this industry, he invited large numbers of German weavers to settle in Russia. Pursuant to the decree issued by the Tsar in 1808, fifty-four colonist families were brought to Poltava where they formed a small German community in the area of today’s Balakina and Skovorody Streets. The Poltava City Council also provided the colonists with a small lot at the junction of Kobelyatska (now Frunze) and Monastyrska Streets for the construction of a Lutheran church. The plans for the church were prepared by the architect Grigorash. This church, dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, was consecrated on November 1st, 1881. It was destroyed in 1933.

Ostrogradsky street

Ostrogradsky street

The first training institute for teachers was opened in Poltava in 1914. It is located in a building constructed in 1903 to house the Gymnasium for Boys, No 2. Renamed Poltava Pedagogical University in 1999, it is famous for its scientific, teaching, and educational traditions.

At the end of the 19th century, the Kremenchuk postal road that start-from Krugla Square was lined with many apartment buildings under construction. At the beginning of the 20th century, the part of the road with, the city limits was renamed Kurakinska Street in honor of Poltava Governor-General Count Alexei Kurakin. In 1913, Poltava celebrated the 300-year anniversary of the Romanov dynasty by planting chestnut trees along both sides of the center strip which divides the street. In the early 1920s the street was renamed Zhovtneva Street. At the time the street was lined mostly with industrial plants and warehouses. All of these buildings were destroyed during World War II. During the post-war years, Zhovtneva Street was rebuilt, and is now the location of many new apartment and administrative buildings, movie theatres, and shops.

Sinna street

Sinna street

The area where Zhovtneva Street crosses Sinna Square used to be just an open area outside of the city that was used by merchants and peasants to sell grain, firewood, hay, vegetables, pottery, and metal wares. The area. remained undeveloped until 1852 when part of it was turned into the Poltava race track (now the location of the Vorskla Stadium), which was operated there until 1917. In 1910 the race track became famous for being the site of the first flight of Sergei Utochkin in a Farman aircraft. In 1894, the Troitska (Trinity) Church was built in one part of the square, and at the beginning of the 20th century, another part of the site was turned into the Romanovsky Park. A two-story industrial school was constructed on additional land donated by Grygory Galagan, a wealthy local landowner. This school trained technicians and craftsmen for agricultural enterprises. In 1947 the school building was handed over to the Poltava Meat Industry Technical School. Before World War II, while the 25th Chapaevska Division was headquartered at the square, the area was used for the testing of tanks. In the 1950s the square was selected for the annual regional agricultural exhibition. In 1950, a monument to Josef Stalin was placed on the square, but was dismantled in 1962. This part of the area is now occupied by the Poltava Regional Administration building.

Nezalezhnosti (Independence) Square, which is located between Zhovtneva and Teatralna Streets, has undergone many name changes. In the beginning of the 19th century the site was known as Yarmarkova (Fair) Square. At the time, the square was very large, extending all the way to Pushkina Street.

For many decades the square was known under the name Felix Dzerzhinsky Square. In 1991 the square’s name was once again changed to Nezalezhnosti Square.

Lenin Street

Lenin Street starts in downtown Poltava and runs from Frunze Street to Myr Avenue in the Levada District. The street was built in the 18th century to connect the Mazurivska Gate of the Poltava Fortress with Podol, an outlying district of the city. At the time the street was divided into three parts named Malo-Petrovska, Nov. Mykolaivska and Rizdvyana. Yarmarkova (Fair) Square is located at the eastern end of the street. In 1903 monument to the Ukrainian poet Ivan Kotlyarevsky was erected at the junction of Lenin Street and Protopopivska Street (now Kotlyarevskogo Street). Another monument, to the famous writer Mykola Gogol, was unveiled in 1934 at the junction of Lenin Street and Gogol Street. During WWII a buildings along Lenin Street were totally destroyed. After the war, the area was fully reconstructed through the joint efforts of local citizens. The Lenin Monument was dedicated in 1960 at Lenin Square (nov Constitution Square). The ne-Poltava Regional Library is locate across from Lenin Square. Today Lenin Street is one of the major thoroughfares of Poltava with many store-banks, cafes, etc.

Podil

Podil

Podil has been one of Poltava's outlying districts since the 17th sentury. It is located in the Vorskla river valley southeast of Poltava downtown area. Records show that in 1895 Podil consisted of 45 peasant homesteads and craftsmen houses with 183 inhabitants, as well as Rozhdestvenskaya Church.Starting in 1852, the Podil district bream famous for hosting the Illinskaya Fair at Kinnoyarmarkova Square. This fair, which in previous years had been held in Romny, was initially a typical a cultural fair for selling horses, cattle, sheep, skins, oil, beeswax, honey, agricultural tools, etc. Later on the focus of the fair shifted to trade in cotton fabrics, woolen cloths, silk and linen. The fair was the largest trading for wool in Russian Empire goods were delivered to the fair from abroad. The fair, which attracted 40,000 visitors in its heyday took place from July 10th until July 20th. At the end of the 19th century the Illinskaya Fair started to decline and by 1920 it had disappeared completely. Now the site where fair was held is covered with apartment buildings.